Posted by Sharon

I seem to have mislain my (old and falling apart) copy of The Prince and the Pauper.  Fortunately, I downloaded a copy from Project Gutenberg some time back.

Let’s see. . .yesterday was Friday — errand day in town.  We had an early appointment with a loan officer, who thinks far more of our finances than we do; which is fine, as she herself said.  No need to spend up to the limit, after all.

After the bank, we went next door to AAA, and had the nice lady make our train reservations To Memphis And Back Again.  We have tickets and receipt in hand.  Note to self: remember to forward receipt to the con for reimbursement.

After that, we went to the vet to pick up some cat food, to Tractor Supply for ditto, and to Hannaford, to pick up prescriptions and foodly things.  Came home, and had crab cakes and fresh steamed green beans for supper.  Mmmmm.

We hired a buyer’s agent, who has taken our modest list and will begin lining up showings, and I actually got some work done, too.

This morning, I read a short piece that will soon be posted for subscribers on our Patreon page (Belle participating by sitting on my lap, and purring.  Loudly.  Listeners will probably be able to hear her.  I hope they’ll be able to hear me.)  When I finish this blog post, I’ll do the dishes, and then! — I’ll sort laundry.

No, I don’t know how I stand the pace, either.

Fifth of Five now at 37,000ish words out of a probable, oh, let’s see. . .100,000?

Captain Waitley wasn’t quite what Portmaster Liu had been expecting.

No, scratch that, in a lot of ways, Captain Waitley was exactly what Portmaster Liu had been expecting: short for a Terran, tall for a Liaden, lean for the height she did have; shoulders showing attitude under a Jump jacket older and bigger than she was. Whatever else she was – and recklessly negligent wasn’t off the table, in Portmaster Liu’s not-exactly-objective opinion – Theo Waitley was definitely a member of Boss Conrad’s extended family, Clan Korval. Portmaster Liu had been spending a lot of time lately with the Boss and the Boss’s little brother, the Road Boss; she knew the family look when she saw it.

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Puppies!

Oct. 20th, 2017 02:40 pm[syndicated profile] rachel_neumeier_feed

Posted by Rachel

On October 4th, this:

I was lucky in the timing! World Fantasy is November 2-5, which is fine, because by then the puppies will be four weeks old and just hitting the very easiest period: old enough to be safe from chills, young enough you needn’t worry much about weaning or at all about housetraining. If Honey had come into season just two weeks later, I’d either have had to skip breeding her or skip the WFC. As it is, everything should be fine, barring wild emergencies.

The puppies are actually two weeks old in this picture. At this point, the boys are well over a pound, the girls right around a pound. The boys started out about seven and a half oz, the girls about five and a half oz. (This is just random, not a sex-related thing. It has to do with quality of the placental connection and the uterine environment, and in this case the girls happened to wind up smaller. One can’t estimate adult size from birth weights or weights at two weeks.)

The little girls opened their eyes at 13 days; Boy 1 at 14 days; and Boy 2, a real little hippo, at 16 days, so I guess we can conclude that size doesn’t influence time of eyes opening. The puppies don’t look much like Cavaliers yet, but they are starting to look like puppies! So now that I’m sure they are thriving, I’m willing to introduce the “L” litter.

Boy 1

Both boys

Girl 1

Girl 2 (top of the pile)

The biggest reason for excitement: FOUR! That may be an average litter size for Cavaliers, but considering my own personal average litter size is closer to 1.7, I’m pretty darn happy to have four healthy puppies.

The only reason for disappointment: only one puppy is really well marked, and alas, he’s a boy. I so did not want to keep another boy, but, well, I am leaning that way at the moment. Neither girl has great markings, with Girl 1 having an unusually dark face:

Girl 1

Since I’m not crazy about the girls’ face markings, I’ll be taking a good look at them both in about seven weeks and making a decision about which to keep solely on type and structure. Though they will change a lot as they grow and their heads take on a proper shape and their faces gain expression — at that point I may find that the markings on Girl 1 actually are kind of cute.

Most breeder-judges do not look a lot at markings, by the way, on the grounds that if you don’t care for a particular dog’s markings, well, they won’t be there in the next generation. But there’s no question that markings are bound to be a deal-breaker when it comes to a hard choice between two dogs that are about equal in other ways.

Meanwhile, while waiting for the puppies to grow up a bit more: “L” names …

We had a pretty snazzy eclipse here. So how about:

Lunar Eclipse
Lunar Madness
Luna Moth
Lavender Moon

You recall that all of these would have “Anara” in front because that is the kennel name.

On the other hand, the mother is Anara Honeysuckle Rose and Kimmie, a full sister, is Anara Kimberlyn Rose, so keeping “Rose” in the name would add extra charm if I wound up keeping one of the girls. In that case, maybe lose the moon theme as a theme and go with:

Lunar Eclipse
Leonidas
Lapis Lazuli
Lavender Rose

Or possibly choose some names that include an “L”, but not as the first letter. For example:

Silent Lucidity
Fiat Lux

And then add random names that just sound good as show names:

Love Affair
Llewellyn Rose

Well, I shall muse upon it. It does help to have the show name suggest the callname. Like anything with Luna or Moon for a girl could be “Luna.” Fiat Lux could easily just be “Lux.” Leonidas easily shortens to “Lon.” What would you call a boy puppy if you named him Lunar Eclipse, though?

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Posted by Rachel

Here’s a good post at Writer UnBoxed: Historical Novels—Your Research To-Do List.

I believe this post caught my eye because a commenter here recently mentioned how annoyed she gets when characters in historical novels have anachronistic names.

This post is about a lot more than that, though it *is* a bit amusing to think of a Regency with a protagonist named, say, Brittney.

I particularly like this suggestion:

Read historical fiction…carefully. An obvious instinct is, “How did other authors do this?” But remember, novelists don’t always get things right. Excellently researched novels are a complement to your research, not a substitution. They are fiction, after all. Unless…

Read novels that were once contemporary. My setting was 1918. So I read and reread Fitzgerald, Hemingway and others who lived then and wrote novels that were contemporary at the time.

This strikes me as perfect advice. I like nonfiction, but I read a lot more fiction and I definitely draw on, say Gillian Bradshaw, for descriptions of architecture. Not for historical settings, of course, but Bradshaw is a great resource for fantasy settings as well. I’d be inclined toward historical novels if I were writing one — and the suggestion to let some of those be contemporary-at-the-time novels is definitely one I would follow.

Right at the moment, a WIP that I’m making some actual progress on is sort of historical. It’s a (very) alternate Regency-ish setting. So I am indeed drawing on Regency novels for setting details, but at the same time I don’t have to get everything right because as I say, (very) alternate. Strongly Regency flavored, shall we say, rather than an actual Regency setting as such.

Still, these suggestions remain good ones. Also, I trust I will avoid naming anybody anything too modern! Not too much a concern because most characters have somewhat odd names anyway, even by the standards of their own society.

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Penric novella

Oct. 19th, 2017 03:06 pm[syndicated profile] rachel_neumeier_feed

Posted by Rachel

Hey, just noticed this from LMB via Goodreads:

I am pleased to report I have finished the first draft of a new Penric & Desdemona novella, sequel to “Mira’s Last Dance”. Title is decided all but one vowel — I’ll add it when my aesthetic waffling concludes. About 44,980 words.

Later: Having spent the whole last day wrestling with one. dratted. vowel., title has finalized as:
“The Prisoner of Limnos”

Good to know this one is a direct sequel to “Mira’s Last Dance,” because (a) that one really needs a sequel, and (b) “Penric’s Fox” wasn’t it.

I thought the latter was pleasant enough, but minor and in no way a substitute for a novella that actually moves the Penric story forward. Despite the fact that I am very fond of literary foxes.

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Posted by Sharon

First, because I know y’all have been holding your breath — two! editors give “Block Party” a thumbs-up, so that will be published to Baen.com on or about December 15, where you — yes, you! — may read it in all it’s glory, for free.

Second, I’ve spent the last two days under the weather — yes, I do wish the weather would pick on someone else, but there you have it.  Tuesday, I just threw in the towel, retired to the corner of the couch, dozed under a blanket of coon cats and read Wildfire at Midnight, possibly my least favorite Stewart, but next in publication order.  Yesterday, I started feeling well enough by evening to write about 2,000 words in a continuing direction in Fifth of Five, so that’s all good.  This morning, I’m definitely feeling more the thing; still, I’m lingering over coffee, keeping  a weather-eye out, before I go off to gym.

This morning, it is quite chilly, and I am wearing the fleece-lined-flannel shirt/jacket (it has sideseam pockets, which I suppose makes it a jacket, rather than a shirt), over the “If you can read this, I have your ring” tshirt.  Steve asked how the flannel shirt felt, and after I finished cooing about how soft and warm it was, wondered if I should buy another.  And, yanno; I’m seriously considering it.  Best. Shirt. Ever.  Even if it is orange.

I may have been remiss here in mentioning that the Narbonic Kickstarter has only 11 more days to go.  They have made their nut, and are into the stretch goals, but if you were a fan back in The Day, you know you want to check this out.

And that?  Is the news that’s fit to print.  I do believe I’ll go to gym.

Fifth of Five still weighing in the 35,000 range, what with this and that.

Snippet

Bitter Truth?” she asked, feeling her eyebrows rise. “Who names a tea Bitter Truth?”

“Obviously, the White Wing Beverage Company does, though in earnest or in jest, I dare not speculate.”

 

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Posted by Rachel

Find an author on the map.

I typed in Lois McMaster Bujold.

The site says “What else do readers of Lois Mcmaster Bujold read? The closer two writers are, the more likely someone will like both of them. Click on any name to travel along.”

Some authors floating near Bujold whom I haven’t read (or not much): Jim Butcher, Glen Cook.

Some authors ditto whom I just love: Dorothy Dunnett, Georgette Heyer — how interesting that the site doesn’t care if they’re SFF authors or other genre authors!

Now let me just click over here to CJ Cherryh, also close to Bujold … okay, after the screen settles down, I can see that Frederick Pohl is generally favored by Cherryh fans. Not by me particularly. Sharon Shinn as well, which is interesting — I love both Cherryh and Shinn, but I would have said they’re quite different. Clicking on Sharon Shinn . . . oh, look, here’s Nicola Griffith way over on the edge. Oh, and here’s Rosemary Kirstein …

Very interesting, oddly compelling site for such bare-bones graphics. The way the names swirl around like minnows in a pond definitely has something to do with that. I encourage you all to click through and try this out.

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One of the strangest objects in the outer Solar System has recently been found to have a ring. One of the strangest objects in the outer Solar System has recently been found to have a ring.


Books read in 2017

Oct. 18th, 2017 01:01 am[syndicated profile] sharonlee_feed

Posted by Sharon

55. Wildfire at Midnight, Mary Stewart (e) (re-read)
54. Madam, Will You Talk?, Mary Stewart (e) (re-read)
53. Princess Holy Aura, Ryk E. Spoor (e)
52.  Epitaph, Mary Doria Russell
51. Shield of Winter, Nalini Singh (e)
50. Heart of Obsidian, Nalini Singh (e)
49. The Cat Who Played Brahms, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
48. Where the Dead Lie, C.S. Harris
47. Going Postal, Terry Pratchett (read aloud w/Steve)
46. Just One Damned Thing After Another, Jodi Taylor (e)
45. Wildfire, Ilona Andrews (e)
44. A Wrinkle in Time, Madeleine L’Engle (e) (re-read)
43. The Rose and the Dagger, Renée Ahdieh
42. Blaze of Memory, Nalini Singh (read aloud w/Steve)
41. The Wrath and the Dawn, Renée Ahdieh
40. Just Like Someone Without Mental Illness Only More So: A Memoir, Mark Vonnegut MD (e)
39. The Rule of Luck, Catherine Cerveny (e) (arc)
38. The Cat Who Saw Red, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
37. The Girl with Ghost Eyes, M.H. Boroson (e)
36. Raising Steam, Terry Pratchett (read aloud w/Steve)
35. White Hot, Ilona Andrews (e)
34.  The Orientalist: Solving the Mystery of a Strange and Dangerous Life, Tom Reiss (e)
33. Mouse and Dragon, Sharon Lee and Steve Miller (e)
32. Caszandra, Andrea K. Host (e)
31. Lab Rat One, Andrea K. Host (e)
30. Stray, Andrea K. Host (e)
29. The Cat Who Turned On and Off, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
28. Apprentice in Death, J.D. Robb (e/l)
27. The Cat Who Ate Danish Modern, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
26. The Face in the Frost, John Bellairs (e)
25. Hanged for a Sheep, Frances and Richard Lockridge (e)
24. Xamnesia, Lizzie Harwood (e)
23. Convergence, C. J. Cherryh, (read aloud with Steve)
22. Rock Addiction, Nalini Singh (e)
21. The Stranger in the Woods, Michael Finkel
20. Etched in Bone, Anne Bishop (e)
19. Rider at the Gate, CJ Cherryh (re-read)
18. Small Gods, Terry Pratchett (read aloud w/Steve)
17. Silence Fallen, Patricia Briggs (e)
16. The Cold Eye, Laura Anne Gilman
15. The Cat Who Could Read Backwards, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
14. Memory, Linda Nagata (e)
13.  Bonita Faye, Margaret Moseley (e)
12.  Burn for Me, Ilona Andrews (e)
11. Snuff, Terry Pratchett (read aloud w/Steve)
10. A Taste of Honey, Kai Ashante Wilson (e)
9.  Some Danger Involved, Will Thomas
8.  Thud!, Terry Pratchett (read aloud w/Steve)
7.  White Tiger, Kylie Chan
6.  The Hanging Tree, Ben Aaronovitch
5.  Trading in Danger, Elizabeth Moon (e)
4.  The Wolf in the Attic, Paul Kearney (e)
3.  The Cat Who Saw Red, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
2.  Inside the Texas Chicken Ranch: The Definitive Account of the Best Little Whorehouse, Jayme Lynn Blaschke (e)
1. Sand of Bone, Blair MacGregor (e)

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Posted by Sharon

The Box from LL Bean arrived.  The slippers are already on my feet, and the fleece-lined flannel shirt?  Baby, this garment is never coming off of my body.

Today’s regular mail brought royalties — that’s statements and checks — for electronic sales made through Baen.com.  So, yay! money in the mail.

Yesterday, we turned in “Block Party,” the requested seasonal story in support of Neogenesis.  This one was something of a challenge, because the request was for “seasonal,” and one naturally doesn’t like to disappoint one’s editor.  However, neither Liadens nor Surebleakeans can possibly celebrate “Christmas;” nor were we persuaded that they would celebrate any of the other winter holidays native to our own Earth.  What that meant was that we had to figure out the “notes” for a seasonal story, and try to construct an in-world story that hit those notesNot really sure we did it right, but our editor promises a quick reading.

Today, it’s back to the salt mines Fifth of Five.  But first?  Lunch, and perhaps even a nap.

Everybody have a good day.

Today’s blog post brought to you by two bands:  The Zombies, who did the original in 1965; and Santana, who covered it in 1977:  “She’s Not There.”

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Posted by Rachel

Here’s an interesting post at The Christian Science Monitor: ‘Blade Runner 2049’: Why some science fiction writers are tired of dystopias

Recent dystopian blockbusters seem to be jostling in a grim race to be the first to reach the seventh circle of hell in Dante’s “Inferno.” But some science-fiction writers are tired of the sorts of pessimistic futures depicted in movies and TV shows such as “The Hunger Games,” “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “Black Mirror,” and “The Handmaid’s Tale.”

In response, influential authors Neal Stephenson, Cory Doctorow, David Brin, and Kim Stanley Robinson argue that futuristic fiction should, instead, offer an inspiring outlook about mankind’s ability to shape its destiny.

I basically never get tired of anything, because I don’t ever seem to read enough of any one subgenre to burn out on it. Well, except grimdark, which I burned out on REAL fast, essentially as soon as I recognized the category. But fundamentally, no, if a new take on a dystopia is well written, I’ll be happy to give it a try.

But to me, dystopias don’t seem fundamentally pessimistic.

Wait, I mean young adult dystopias don’t seem fundamentally pessimistic.

In YA dystopian fiction, the horrible repressive government always gets destroyed, thus laying the groundwork for a better future. (Are there exceptions? Let me know and I will avoid those.) YA dystopias are thus fundamentally optimistic and The Hunger Games does not belong in the same sentence as The Handmaid’s Tale. Really, I don’t know how the author of this post — Stephen Humphries — could have missed this obvious distinction between YA and adult dystopian fiction.

On the other hand, Humphries is in fact actually framing a broader argument about literature and society, and about pessimistic versus optimistic visions of the future:

But perhaps the debate over utopian versus dystopian fiction should be reframed. A more helpful distinction might be the difference between nihilism and existentialism in science fiction. Amid doom-and-gloom scenarios, does the hero or heroine have agency and an ability to win the day?

And there you go, there is the fundamental distinction between grimdark and everything else, rather than between dystopia and everything else.

Humprhies seems to be lacking some of the background categories — dark vs grimdark, for example — which would make it easier to frame thoughts on this topic. This is true even though opinions differ about what delineates various categories of SFF. Still, the post is worth a look if you have a minute to click through and read the whole thing.

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Good News Tuesday

Oct. 17th, 2017 02:25 pm[syndicated profile] rachel_neumeier_feed

Posted by Rachel

This week, as so often, a focus on medical good news. I believe I’ll start trying to alternate: medicine vs everything else.

This first one is pretty darned good:

Arming Bodies with CRISPR to Fight Huntington’s Disease

Huntington’s is so awful, and there has never been anything much we could do about it. Now: In a study published in August, Yeo and his colleagues used CRISPR-Cas9 to destroy errant repeats in RNA sequences. When tested in the lab, Yeo’s CRISPR tool obliterated 95 percent or more of these RNA knots in cells harboring Huntington’s disease and a type of ALS. … The researchers also tested the approach on a form of inherited muscular dystrophy, called myotonic dystrophy. They were able to eliminate 95 percent of faulty RNAs in muscle cells taken from patients. After they applied CRISPR, the once-diseased cells resembled healthy ones. Yeo thinks more than 20 genetic diseases that are caused by toxic RNA repeats could potentially be treated this way.

Onward!

Huntington’s and similar conditions have been problems for ages, but “superbugs” are of course a modern phenomenon. I’m waiting for therapies that don’t involve antibiotics to be developed, since that seems like the most promising avenue to deal with drug-resistant bacteria. Here’s an in-between type of therapy: a way of boosting the performance of older antibiotics:

Light-Activated Nanoparticles Help Fight Drug-Resistant Superbugs

Our strongest antibiotics are increasingly defenseless against the nastiest bacterial infections, but the use of new light-activated nanoparticles could give those old drugs a fighting chance. In a paper published today in Science Advances, researchers reported that quantum dots—light-activated semiconductor nanoparticles—when engineered at a particular size can sneak into bacteria, disrupt their cellular processes, and make them more susceptible to antibiotics.

The discovery could breathe new life into old antibiotics, says Anushree Chatterjee, a chemical and biological engineer at the University of Colorado Boulder, who co-authored the report. It also exemplifies how electrical engineering can be used to address problems typically approached purely though medicine.

Next, a very science-fiction-y wound treatment, although I question the use of the word “heals” here:

Injectable glue heals wounds in seconds

The injectable glue, MeTro, is based on a naturally occurring protein called tropaelastin. It is applied directly to the wound and is then activated with UV light to form a complete seal, eliminating the need for staples or stitches. Its elasticity means it’s designed to work well on shape-changing internal organs like the lungs and heart.

A study published in journal Science Translational Medicine showed the glue quickly and successfully sealed incisions in the arteries and lungs of rodents and the lungs of pigs.

Of course there’s quite a difference between “healing” and “sealing,” but hey.

And speaking of misleading headlines, this one is probably a trifle overstated:

An End to Blindness?

But still, it sounds pretty cool:

If you had seen Lisa Kulik and her husband strolling the grounds of the University of Southern California’s Eye Institute last summer, you would have thought nothing of it. But for Kulik, that simple walk around the campus was “a miracle.” Blind for more than two decades from an inherited eye disease called retinitis pigmentosa, Kulik was seeing again — clearly enough to make out the sidewalk and the grassy edge — thanks to a sophisticated microchip implanted in one of her eyes.

The device, called the Argus II, is just one of a growing number of bold new approaches to treating blindness, offering hope to the millions of mostly older Americans in danger of losing their sight from macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and other eye diseases.

The reason this can’t possibly be sufficient to fix “blindness” is that sometimes blindness results from a problem in the brain, not a problem in the eye. Plus I have no doubt that this microchip will fail to work for some conditions affecting the eye. Still . . . faster, please!

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Both gravitational and electromagnetic radiations have been detected in Both gravitational and electromagnetic radiations have been detected in


Posted by Rachel

I’m not much for horror, really, but given the time of year, this list from Book Riot caught my eye: 14 of the Scariest YA Books for Horror Fans

Especially because I’ve met the author of The May Queen Murders, Sarah Jude. She’s often at Archon; she’s probably local or local-ish to the St. Louis area.

Nice cover, eh? I like the pink lettering across this horror cover.

Ivy’s family has lived in Rowan’s Glen, a remote farming community in the Missouri Ozarks, for centuries. The other kids at school may think the Glen kids are weird, but Ivy doesn’t care—she has her cousin Heather as her best friend. The two girls share everything with each other—or so Ivy thinks. When Heather goes missing after a May Day celebration, Ivy discovers that both her best friend and her beloved hometown are as full of secrets as the woods that surround them.

I do read a little horror, now and then. Maybe I’ll give this a try.

Another book on this list, There’s Someone Inside Your House by Stephanie Perkins, that strikes me exemplifying a super-unlikely type of horror plot. I mean, super-unlikely but you see it all the time. Here’s the description:

One-by-one, the students of Osborne High are dying in a series of gruesome murders, each with increasing and grotesque flair. As the terror grows closer and the hunt intensifies for the killer, the dark secrets among them must finally be confronted. This is a fresh take on the classic teen slasher story that’s fun, quick-witted, and completely impossible to put down.

Pop quiz for the parents out there: the students at your kid’s high school are getting gruesomely murdered. You:

a) Tell your kid to be careful and stay with groups.

b) Decide this is an excellent time for a family vacation, pull the kid out of school, and vamoose.

I just can’t see anybody picking Option A. If the parents have trouble getting out of town for practical reasons, this is a fine time to send the kid to stay with grandma. Or hey, at the very least, time to withdraw the kid from school and try out homeschooling. Who in their right mind would let their kid set foot anywhere near this high school while the murders are still going on?

Lots of horror plots like that. You know, if I moved into a new house and blood started running down the walls and a voice hissed GET OUT, I don’t know about you, but I would skedaddle.

Here’s the one from this list that most appeals to me:

The Girl From The Well by Rin Chupeco

A dead girl walks the streets. She hunts murderers. Child killers, much like the man who threw her body down a well three hundred years ago. And when a strange boy bearing stranger tattoos moves into the neighborhood so, she discovers, does something else. And soon both will be drawn into the world of eerie doll rituals and dark Shinto exorcisms that will take them from American suburbia to the remote valleys and shrines of Aomori, Japan. Because the boy has a terrifying secret—one that would just kill to get out.

This sounds pretty neat!

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Hearphones Update

Oct. 16th, 2017 01:38 pm[syndicated profile] sharonlee_feed

Posted by Sharon

Frequent readers of this journal will recall that Steve and I drove to Burlington Massachusetts back in mid-September in order to explore and experience the Bose Hearphones.  We undertook this pilgrimage because I am losing my hearing, as one does, and find it particularly difficult to hear my tablemates in restaurants and bars.  As a writer, of course, I spend much of my time in bars, hotel lobbies, restaurants, and other noisy places, so this deficiency was starting to affect my work.

So, the Hearphones, which not only have directional amplification, but noise-cancelling.  I took them with me to Baltimore, where they received a series of stern tests; the sternest of which was at The Tilted Kilt.

For those who are, as I was, ignorant of this eating establishment — it’s Hooters in Plaid.  It is also one of those places that believes that NOISE IS GOOD.  MORE NOISE MEANS WE’RE HAVING FUN!  LOTS AND LOTS AND LOTS OF FUN!

In fact, The Tilted Kilt is exactly the kind of place that I have in the past actually bolted away from, once the door has been opened sufficiently for the din to escape; and I can feel it strip away whole decibel levels.

Sensing an Opportunity, however, I nodded to Steve and we went in to have lunch.  It was noisy.  Ghod, it was noisy.  An array of televisions were on and blaring over the bar, the music was blasting straight down — and it was just such a constant assault, you could barely pull together enough concentration to read the menu.

I put on the Hearphones, and — I could still hear the music, and it was LOUD.  And right then, I said to Steve, “These things don’t work.  I’m taking them back.”

. . .and I took the plugs out of my ears.

Oh.

My.

Ghod.

The Hearphones worked.  They really did work.  I couldn’t get the plugs back in fast enough.

“I’m keeping them,” I said to Steve.

Now, there was a downside.  Though I could, though the magic of technology, dampen the music to merely stupid levels, and I could zoom in on Steve, so I could hear him?

He, working with plain old, unaugmented human ears, couldn’t hear a word I said.

So, I’m keeping the Hearphones.  I still need to get used to hearing my own voice inside my ears, and listening to oneself eat is kinda off-putting, but with practice many things are possible.

Also, I seem to have overcome the early problems I had with keeping them charged — operator error due to misunderstanding regarding the controls.  I had assumed that they would turn themselves off after X time of not receiving a bluetooth signal from the phone.  Nope.  Gotta turn them OFF.

Here ends my report.

EDITED TO ADD:  Google is apparently not your friend in this, and even a search on BOSE HEARPHONES does not return a good result.  Therefore!  Here’s your link.

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Books read in 2017

Oct. 16th, 2017 01:16 am[syndicated profile] sharonlee_feed

Posted by Sharon

54. Madam, Will You Talk?, Mary Stewart (e) (re-read)
53. Princess Holy Aura, Ryk E. Spoor (e)
52.  Epitaph, Mary Doria Russell
51. Shield of Winter, Nalini Singh (e)
50. Heart of Obsidian, Nalini Singh (e)
49. The Cat Who Played Brahms, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
48. Where the Dead Lie, C.S. Harris
47. Going Postal, Terry Pratchett (read aloud w/Steve)
46. Just One Damned Thing After Another, Jodi Taylor (e)
45. Wildfire, Ilona Andrews (e)
44. A Wrinkle in Time, Madeleine L’Engle (e) (re-read)
43. The Rose and the Dagger, Renée Ahdieh
42. Blaze of Memory, Nalini Singh (read aloud w/Steve)
41. The Wrath and the Dawn, Renée Ahdieh
40. Just Like Someone Without Mental Illness Only More So: A Memoir, Mark Vonnegut MD (e)
39. The Rule of Luck, Catherine Cerveny (e) (arc)
38. The Cat Who Saw Red, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
37. The Girl with Ghost Eyes, M.H. Boroson (e)
36. Raising Steam, Terry Pratchett (read aloud w/Steve)
35. White Hot, Ilona Andrews (e)
34.  The Orientalist: Solving the Mystery of a Strange and Dangerous Life, Tom Reiss (e)
33. Mouse and Dragon, Sharon Lee and Steve Miller (e)
32. Caszandra, Andrea K. Host (e)
31. Lab Rat One, Andrea K. Host (e)
30. Stray, Andrea K. Host (e)
29. The Cat Who Turned On and Off, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
28. Apprentice in Death, J.D. Robb (e/l)
27. The Cat Who Ate Danish Modern, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
26. The Face in the Frost, John Bellairs (e)
25. Hanged for a Sheep, Frances and Richard Lockridge (e)
24. Xamnesia, Lizzie Harwood (e)
23. Convergence, C. J. Cherryh, (read aloud with Steve)
22. Rock Addiction, Nalini Singh (e)
21. The Stranger in the Woods, Michael Finkel
20. Etched in Bone, Anne Bishop (e)
19. Rider at the Gate, CJ Cherryh (re-read)
18. Small Gods, Terry Pratchett (read aloud w/Steve)
17. Silence Fallen, Patricia Briggs (e)
16. The Cold Eye, Laura Anne Gilman
15. The Cat Who Could Read Backwards, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
14. Memory, Linda Nagata (e)
13.  Bonita Faye, Margaret Moseley (e)
12.  Burn for Me, Ilona Andrews (e)
11. Snuff, Terry Pratchett (read aloud w/Steve)
10. A Taste of Honey, Kai Ashante Wilson (e)
9.  Some Danger Involved, Will Thomas
8.  Thud!, Terry Pratchett (read aloud w/Steve)
7.  White Tiger, Kylie Chan
6.  The Hanging Tree, Ben Aaronovitch
5.  Trading in Danger, Elizabeth Moon (e)
4.  The Wolf in the Attic, Paul Kearney (e)
3.  The Cat Who Saw Red, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
2.  Inside the Texas Chicken Ranch: The Definitive Account of the Best Little Whorehouse, Jayme Lynn Blaschke (e)
1. Sand of Bone, Blair MacGregor (e)

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